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bobistheowl

My newest font is DOS Boot, which reproduces the DOS command prompt font in True Type. There will be a companion font to this one which will include the box drawing symbols, smilie faces, card suits, maths, etc. I won't be putting this one on my site until after the supplements font is completed.

 

You can get this font for a week at:

 

 

https://www.yousendit.com/transfer.php?action=batch_download&batch_id=bVlBa0ZSbEFEbUpFQlE9PQ

 

 

In addition, there will be a 250% larger version of this font, named Fist Six. A lot of editing still needs to be done on that one, but it does look fine between 10 and 22 points, (equivelent to 25 - 55 points for DOS Boot). It's not ready to share yet. There's will also be a second set of fonts exactly the same, but with standard black text on white. One of these is complete

 

I debugged all point sizes except 9 points, using Notepad in Windows XP. I have found, however, that with this typeface, what looks right on my computer doesn't necessarily look the same on another one. The beta225 version that I circulated to a few people on Friday looked horrid. I believe the changes I've made since then have solved the problem, but I can't test it.

 

I also get odd results with this font in MicroSoft Word. At a number of point sizes, there are grid lines around groups of letters. At larger point sizes, there is a horizontal white line between most, but not all, lines. This is caused because I had to extend the height slightly on a few glyphs, or there would have been a small white line above selected characters at 20 point size. I can see why there are so few white text on black fonts. I had to do much microediting at each point size to remove slivers of white, without disturbing the monospacing. This, along with Fix Cyst, are my first fonts with an Unicode range, (there are 150 different glyphs, including many accented characters).

 

This font works best at 14 and 16 points. Fortunately, the 14 point size works perfectly in Microsoft Word. If other people have the same problems with this font in Word, though, its' use as a display face will be much diminished.

 

My copy of Word is screwy. I can't type the single or double quotes from any of the fonts I make with ScanFont, but I can copy them in from somewhere else. They do appear in Notepad, Word Pad, and the character map.

 

 

It would help me a lot if a few people could try this font in other apps, to see how it acts.

 

Anyway, I hope you like it. I have another new one to post in its' own thread.

 

~bito

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bobistheowl

My other new font is Fix Cyst. It's an enormous retro display face which would look best for text at about 6 points, but that will be covered by the 14point size in the 40% version of this, to be called Notepad Classic.

 

This is the old fixedsys system font used as the default Notepad font until Windows ME. I think it was the only font that could be used in Notepad in Windows '95, and possibly '98. It's also the inverse of the DOS command prompt font which I've just fonted as DOS Boot. In MS Word, the 40% version can be simulated by using the DOS Boot font, and making the highlight colour black, and the text colour white.

 

 

I'll be doing a second one at both the large and small sizes, to include the box drawing glyphs, Greek letters, arrows, etc. This group with black text on white will go a lot faster than the Fist Six/DOS Boot families.

 

I won't be putting this font on my site until after I complete the supplements font, but you can get it here for a week:

 

 

https://www.yousendit.com/transfer.php?action=batch_download&batch_id=bVlBa0ZVNkd0Ni92Wmc9PQ

 

 

The only bug for me was that I couldn't type the single or double quotes when using MS Word, but I think that may be a problem with my app.

 

This font would be very useful to anyone who is looking to design their own alphabet, as this font is very simplified, but structurally sound. each glyph can be made in a 12x8 pixel matrix. The sharp edges smooth a lot as the text gets smaller, and it looks much different when it's large. (the maximum point size in Notepad was 14 points, which would be around 5 points in Fix Cyst).

 

~bito

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bobistheowl

I made a couple of minor revisions to this font. I don't think the tilde, (~), was included in the previous version, and I removed the spacing pixels from the lower case z and the left brace, ({). Those mistakes can probably only be seen at 48 and 72 point size. When I complete the supplementary font, I'll rerelease this one.

 

Sorry about that.

 

~bito

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Guest nulleke

here is a softball one:

 

http://rapidshare.com/files/159039003/JessicasSoftballFont.zip

 

 

Maggy

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bobistheowl

The first font from my Obey Giant series is complete. I actually did two versions on Wednesday. The first one will probably be scrapped, except for the character guide. Luc Devroye had a lot of problems with it. It works fine on my Windows XP in MS Word 2000, but after trying out the newer version, it's been improved considerably.

 

I'll be releasing the actual font later today or tomorrow. I will need to make some minor revisions to the read me after Luc and I decide which files will be posted on my site. For now, I have for you a point size character guide in which the font has been embedded in an MS Word document. It's available here:

 

4shared.com - document sharing - download Obey Christmas2 4x4 point size chart.doc

 

In this document, I typed the alphabet as a string, ie: AAAAAAAAAAAAABBBBBBBBBBBBBBBCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCCC etc, as the font is meant to be tiled or typed sequentially. It makes especially nice border ornaments at 8 point size. Keep in mind that I use very large source graphics, so 8 points in this font is the same size as 18-20 points in most fonts. Selecting the document and changing the point size often yields patterns that look completely different than they do when larger or smaller.

 

Obey Christmas2 4x4 is a series of tiled patterns based on a stylized image of the Obey Giant face, drawn in a 14x11 matrix, and expanded ten times. Alternate versions are created by flipping the image 180 degrees, and inverting the colours for both. The four images can be combined in 20 different ways: (4+3+2+1)x2.

 

Since the basic tiles only use 20 glyphs, I made two harlequin patterns and larger versions of the harlequins, to fill out the remainder of an upper case alphabet.

 

The file size of the .ttf font is only 196 kb, and I was able to convert it to a 44 kb .otf file. I was also able to generate Type 1 versions, but with enormous file sizes, so those ones might not be distributed, unless specifically requested.

 

I was really pleased with the clarity of this font. ScanFont usually does a mediocre job of converting my monochrome bitmaps to glyphs, but I looked at the 8 point glyphs in MS Word at 500% zoom, and there was no degradation whatsoever.

 

This is the first font that I've made entirely from scratch, instead of modifying an existing photograph or piece of artwork. It's called Obey Christmas2 because many of the patterns resemble Christmas wrapping paper when seen at certain point sizes. The Giant's faces, hidden within the patterns, display a personal statement about the commercial aspect of Christmas gift giving.

 

Unlike most of my previous fonts, this one actually has a practical use, mostly at smaller point sizes. This series is far and away my best work yet. I've set a goal of completing the entire series, which now will probably be at least ten fonts, by the end of April.

 

I also should be completing Obey Christmas1 in the next couple of days. It's based on another stylized version of the Giant Face, this time drawn in a 28x24 matrix, and expanded five times, so the patterns will be similar, but also quite different. I may make a harlequin version of this other Christmas font. I'll do some testing and see what that would look like. I hope you like this sample. I'll give a download link for the full font package in this thread ASAP.

 

~bito

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bobistheowl

What I have discovered is that my math skills diminish considerably when I stay up all night making fonts. There are actually 64 permutations for the glyph patterns, not 20 (!), so I'll be redoing these in two fonts instead of one. All of the bitmaps are done, though, so it will only be a couple of hours' work. Luc Devroye gave me some feedback, so I may be able to make these even better.

 

~bito

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bobistheowl

I'm currently working on a twenty-one font family named Schizophrenia. I've completed all of the bitmaps and character guides, and the first three fonts, which are available here:

 

4shared.com - online file sharing and storage - download 23-4-09.rar

 

The 23-4-09.rar file contains Schizophrenia1, 2 & 3, in .ttf, .otf, and Type1, a character guide. some source graphics from this series in 24 bit bitmap, and a sample of how the fonts can be used, in .png.

 

Schizophrenia and its' related fonts produce three dimensional images in the sense that, if the font is printed in a 3x9 matrix, it can be rolled into a cylinder whereby the left and right edges of the page, or the top and bottom of the page, form one continuous image, but the colour changes at the joining point. Schizophrenia2 is a horizontally flipped version of Schizophrenia1, and #3 is #1 rotated 180 degrees. Seven different fonts will have these three orientations.

 

Tiling Schizophrenia1,2,or 3 with its' counterpart from SchizophreniaInv1, 2 or 3, (coming soon), in a 2x2 matrix of form:

ab

ba

 

will create one large, seamless image where the colours on the left and right or the top and bottom will flow together. All of the fonts in this series can be tiled together to make larger images, with some of the tiling options shown in the .png graphic. Please note that the two sections at lower left in the tiling sample are not meant to be tiled with each other, but they tile with other pieces of the tiling sample.

 

On a blank bitmap of 840x2520 pixel dimensions, I drew ten lines with different slopes. When a line reached the edge of the bitmap, I continued it on the opposite side, and I continued to do this until the line returned to its' origin coordinates. The intersections of three or more lines create polygons, and I defined alternate areas are either white or black, (in the original graphics, the colours are red and white for the positive image, and aqua and black for the inverted colour version. The lines themselves are dark in both versions, so only the colour fill changes).

 

The result looks quite chaotic, but there is order within the madness. The 'lines only' graphic makes this easier to see. This is perhaps the first font family where entire fonts can be tiled together to create larger images.

 

I'll be making the other 18 fonts over the next few days. These take longer than most of my other fonts, because precise spacing between glyphs is so crucial. I believe that the Type1 and .otf versions should work OK, but I am waiting for Luc Devroye to let me know if he finds any bugs in those. The .ttf version works perfectly in Notepad.

 

When I finish this, I'll be returning to my 'Obey' series. The completion date for those fonts has been moved forward to accomodate this project, so I now expect that series to be complete in mid-May. I'll let you all know when I have those finished.

 

Thanks,

 

~bito

 

Added April 25:

 

If anyone can't download from 4shared, use this Rapidshare link:

 

http://rapidshare.com/files/224972582/23-4-09.rar.html

 

but it's only good for ten downloads.

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